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August 23, 2019Cart

Lifestyle

by WAG
by WAG

Tried and true

Tiffany True engagement rings in platinum with a white diamond and 18-karat gold with a fancy yellow diamond. Courtesy Tiffany & Co.
Tiffany True engagement rings in platinum with a white diamond and 18-karat gold with a fancy yellow diamond. Courtesy Tiffany & Co.

The redesigned Tiffany & Co. at The Westchester in White Plains is a narrative of love — a love affair with its customers.

It begins with 360-degree cases that allow you to try on baubles, bangles and beads — so to speak — yourself. It sweeps you into the Wheat Leaf Pavilion where the 182-year-old company’s iconic diamond engagement rings are joined by the new Tiffany True design. It envelopes you in curated spaces for color-block home and garden offerings, fragrances, children’s treasures and a personalization counter for engraving while you wait in intimate sitting areas. Finally, it enables you to have your selections and experience all wrapped up and ready to go at the Blue Box Wrapping Station.

Everything about and in the reimagined 4,500-square-foot space has a fresh, modern feel, from the wheat leaf glazed glass detailing to the whimsical robots at play in side vitrines to chief artistic officer Reed Krakoff’s sparely elegant takes on the company’s Atlas collection and key-shaped creations. 

His Tiffany True diamond ring — Tiffany’s first new engagement ring in 10 years — offers the same crisp, clean lines. The square, mixed-cut diamond, unique to Tiffany, has a T-shaped detail in the setting and a platinum band and sits low on the finger, a fitting metaphor for a luxe jewelry and silver emporium that is in the words of Richard Moore, divisional vice president of global store design and creative visual merchandising, moving away from “a permissions-based shopping experience.”

And yet, in refreshing its looks, Tiffany has gone back to the future. Elsa Peretti — she of the open hearts — and Paloma Picasso, with her irresistible olive leaf climber earrings, continue to be mainstays, as do Jean Schlumberger’s organic, enameled creations. The wheat leaf turns out to be a traditional motif. And the company’s commitment to service is as it ever was. 

In other words, in modernizing, Tiffany has stayed true to itself.

For more, visit tiffany.com.