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August 18, 2019Cart

Lifestyle

by WAG
by WAG

Another season blooms

Au Ciel Floral Design Studio created a fittingly artful display in the art gallery on the mansion’s second floor, as seen during the April 5 preview of the Lyndhurst Flower Show in Tarrytown. Photograph by Mary Shustack.
Au Ciel Floral Design Studio created a fittingly artful display in the art gallery on the mansion’s second floor, as seen during the April 5 preview of the Lyndhurst Flower Show in Tarrytown. Photograph by Mary Shustack.

WAG got a sneak peek of the Lyndhurst Flower Show, touring the two floors of stunning displays just before the start of the preview party April 5.

It would be the beginning of a weekend of activities that included the flower show, an antiques show and a high tea – altogether marking the season-opening weekend for the National Trust for Historic Preservation site.

As with past flower shows held at the Tarrytown property, this one was a memorable event filled with elaborate displays and artistry at every turn.

Highlights were countless, from the tour-de-force Au Ciel Floral Design Studio work filling the art gallery to the lush orchid-filled dining room scene created by Colonial Village Flowers to artist Portia Munson’s three-story floral work adding drama to the stairwell.

The showstopper was the reception room display of floral headpieces by Joshua Werber, intricate, delicate pieces that set off mannequins dressed in period clothing from Lyndhurst heiress Anna Gould.

We enjoyed catching up with Ned Kelly of Ned Kelly & Company, who shared details of his breathtaking entry hall display celebrating tulips and roses, and meeting Gerald Palumbo of Seasons On the Hudson. The two are co-founders of the show that not only showcases contemporary floral design but serves to spotlight the property, its history and traditions.

As Palumbo said, “I’m so pleased because these designers have really given their all. They have really shown their respect for the house.”

And Howard Zar, Lyndhurst’s executive director, was also rightfully proud of the event, which not only attracted major contemporary artists with ties to the Hudson Valley but also gave visitors a taste of the  restorations under way at Lyndhurst, which he said is not just a historic house but “also a historic landscape.”

As the photographs above hint, it was quite a display – and if we’ve whet your appetite, then you’ll certainly want to check out our May “Fascinating Landscapes” issue for Bob Rozycki’s full story and photographs of the event.

For more, visit Lyndhurst.org.

– Mary Shustack